Pinterest: A different kind of social media platform

Photo courtesy of Pinterest Newsroom.

ANNA SMITH | OPINION COLUMNIST | agsmith2@butler.edu

In today’s day and age, we are surrounded by social media that largely dictates how we feel, what we’re feeling and the ways in which to share them.  

These platforms want you to interact with them, and they have algorithms that tailor to your clicks and get you to spend as much time on them as possible. The stalking spiral can become endless. 

There’s a platform, however, that largely falls under the radar. This is truly a shame. 

Pinterest often gets lost in the sea of entertainment-driven apps, but here’s why I think it can be so beneficial.

Pinterest is one of the few platforms where all of the content isn’t coming from famous people and the people close to you. This means that you can’t be unintentionally hurt or caught off guard from someone’s post. 

The pseudo-anonymous nature of this app creates a creative, safe atmosphere.I would even go so far as to say that Pinterest isn’t a true social media platform, and in the best way. You are allowed to pin pictures to boards that you create, public or private, which harbors creativity and creates a freer, healthier way to express yourself.

Pinterest takes what you’ve pinned and shows you similar photos at an immediate, constant rate. In other words, the more DIY pins you interact with, the more DIY pins will appear.

When I’m feeling sad, an emotion I think we all feel a lot more than we let other people know, a productive way to feel better without feeling like I’m bothering anyone is utilizing Pinterest. No matter what situation you’re in, someone’s also felt the same way and is good enough with words to have made a beautiful graphic out of that pain.

Reading words of strangers who have felt the same way I have, and have lived to grow and heal is really comforting.

I know how much this helps me, and when a friend needs a little boost, I send them those quotes and it makes them feel a bit less alone too. By doing this, those inspirational quotes just keep coming and that algorithm will keep sending those motivational vibes your way.

Pinterest also allows you to live outside your fashion and lifestyle comfort zones. That Balencia sweatsuit is just not a feasible clothing item to have in your closet. While you may not be able to buy all the clothes you pin, it often sparks general outfit inspo from clothes already in your closet or a cheap dupe from a thrift store. 

It also lets us live our top chef fantasies by pinning the most delicious, outrageous, beautiful foods. Whether it’s fancy cuisine from around the world, Domino’s Pizza or a recipe to try cooking for your own, the food boards are prime real estate.

Does the thought of pizza make you want to travel to Italy? Or maybe you’d like to have a picnic on the beach. Hiking Joshua Tree National Park sound good? Look no further than travel boards. These boards help me escape central Indiana, especially when it’s in negative temperatures. 

In general, Pinterest feeds my organizational needs because of the extensive categorization the boards offer. Similar to making a curated Spotify playlist, each of your boards are allowed to have their own mood, essence and personality. 

In a world of constant dishevelment, a little bit of organization, even if it’s seemingly meaningless, goes a long way. Even a board just to fulfill your aesthetic needs can help brighten your day and facilitate positive growth.

Life is scary a lot of the times, and it’s nice to exist in our comfort zones. But sometimes we want to live in faraway places or wear the craziest clothing or plan for our future homes or be bombarded with as many photos of dogs as possible.

This world of possibilities can all be found within Pinterest’s welcoming walls — without judgement or hesitation.

 Start pinning.  

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