Bulldogs of Butler- Annie DeVoe

Spotlighting the everyday humans around campus

SARAH COFFING

CULTURE ASST. EDITOR

Students amble in and out of Starbucks, the doors never seeming to open or shut completely.

The low-key tune of coffee shop music floats outside the building and onto the sidewalk. Groups of students huddle in threes or fours over homework, secrets or even a little white poodle.

A mother accompanied by her two children stops to look at the scenery while taking a break from their bike ride.

Annie DeVoe, a sophomore journalism major, is headed to Atherton Union for dinner after an exhausting day of classes.

Despite her recent frustrations with the class enrollment process, DeVoe remembers to always stay positive.

“Always give people a smile, whether or not you are happy,” she said.

DeVoe, in her vibrant blue, green and yellow patterned maxi skirt and black tank top featuring the white outline of a diamond, beams.

If she could give one piece of advice to a large group of people, she said, it would be “just to treat everyone else with respect.”

The way that one person might view another isn’t important, she said. No matter what, no one is above or below anyone else, and everyone should be treated “in the same light.”

“Everybody has good, everybody has bad, and it is not something you can ever get away from,” DeVoe said.

DeVoe fumbles with her iPhone while she talks, and her backpack sits patiently at her feet. She scans the crowd around her, but remains fixed on making her point.

Life and perception are all a matter of opinion, she said.

“Somebody’s hell could be somebody else’s heaven,” she said, meaning that we shouldn’t judge each other just based on outward appearances or first impressions.

DeVoe said we, as humans, should live our lives focusing on only our perceptions of ourselves.

“There is no rulebook to life,” she said. “You just need to live how you want to live, and live to be happy, and don’t live to conform to somebody else’s standards.”

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